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IPhone as Vindication

September 3, 2011

There’s a common misconception going around the net’o’sphere that the proliferation of phone camera photography is contributing to an attitude that anyone can call themselves a photographer. This has sparked an ongoing debate about whether photographers can claim to be artists.

In reality, I believe that this revival of lofi photography is really showing us that indeed, it’s not technology that takes a photo from snapshot to art.

I’ve just stumbled across a great article on pixiq.com showcasing 100 Amazing iPhone Photos which is, as far as I’m concerned, proof that today’s high-megapixel-do-everything-for-you DSLR cameras are not the leveling fields some people think they are.  A couple of thousand dollars will no doubt get you an amazing piece of technology, but it won’t buy you a place on the great photographer’s bench.

In the hands of someone with a gifted eye even a lowly phone, or toy, camera can produce art. And produce is the significant word here. The technology produces the image, but it’s the photographer that creates it. It’s the photographer who turns a portrait into art, and makes a common everyday sight take your breath away. It’s passion and pure human spirit that leaves you speechless when you stare at a great photo, not megapixels.

It’s easy for photographers themselves to get caught up in the geeky high of bigger, better optics, improved sensors, and lightning fast frames-per-seconds. It’s easy for us to think that if we just didn’t have the imitations of our equipment we could capture that sublime memorable image we all long for.

But we are actually the thing that limits us the most. And these noteworthy photos captured by the lowly iPhone camera are a pretty good reminder of that annoying truth.

I love capturing images; it’s a creative rush I’m very addicted to. I think it’s wonderful that my friends love me so much they think my photos are amazing. But I know I have a long way to go before I can call myself an artist.

The technology and the classes help…but they aren’t the key.

So, what is the key?

I guess I’ll just have to let you know when I find it. ::sigh::

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Dawn permalink
    October 10, 2011 2:37 pm

    I guess I am biassed because I am your mother but,your comments I think are very true. the saying ” beauty is in the eye of the beholder ” is so true. We are all different, in what we see as “art” It is a personal thing. Love Mom

    • cindiaugustine permalink*
      October 10, 2011 5:17 pm

      Awww, thanks mom! Glad you agree. 🙂 Glad you found my blog, too.

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